Indian Influence in 1960’s Fabric Design

Leave a comment

In the late 1960’s and early 70’s there was a great fascination for Eastern cultures. The Beatles especially were very interested in Indian music and were influential in spreading the word widely. Music, art and fabric designed for clothing and interiors all showed this trend.

It was a fashionable, especially with the hippy movement to wear kaftans, paisley designs and batik printed clothing from India.  The style was reflect in much of the fashion of the time.

2012FT0864-zandra-rhodes-960a

Zandra Rhodes 1969 circle dress now in the V&A museum, in an Indian influenced print.

Rolling-Stones-002

 Mick Jagger in 1967 wearing a paisley print jacket.

 

Indian fabrics were also widely used in interiors, for bed spreads and curtains.

18422112_1534003756618160_3129754118015957673_o

The curtains above in a fabric called ‘indian summer’ designed by Jyoti Bhomik for Heals in 1966. Jyoti Bhomik a young designer born in India worked exclusively for Heal’s during the 1960’s,  his fabric is still sought after today.

 

$_1

 

British designers of the era such as Collier Campbell also showed their interest in eastern culture in fabric designs such as ‘Zebak’ and ‘kasbah’.

Website

Ebay

Facebook

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Vintage Brocade Fabric & the Jacquard Loom

Leave a comment

Brocade is a decorative woven fabric with a raised pattern made to mimic embroidery. It was originally made using silk for rich dress making fabric, as in this bustle dress from 1880’s.

worthx

 

The Jacquard loom was introduced in 1804 , using a series of punched cards it made it easier to weave the complicated patterns needed for brocade, damask and matelassé fabrics. Brocade type fabric began to be made using heavier cotton making it longer lasting, therefore good for upholstery.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A jacquard loom showing punch cards

There is an excellent blog by Leimomi Oakes ‘the dreamstress’ on the history of the jacquard loom and the weaves it creates. 

 

s-l1600a

Cotton brocade with silky threads from the 1930’s or 40’s – for curtains and throws

Check out my ebay shop for this and other vintage brocade fabric

 

s-l1600-2

Heavier tapestry weave brocade for upholstery. the stripes on reverse called brocade variant

 

s-l1600-1a

Typically the pattern and colour of jacquard brocade is reversed on the back,  satin weave giving a silky shine.

s-l1600-4a

 

s-l1600-8

Damask fabric has a finer weave and the pattern is less raised than other brocades, the design is still reversed on the back.

Website

Ebay

Facebook

 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

 

Toile de Jouy Fabric

Leave a comment

Toile prints were originally produced in Ireland in the mid-18th Century and quickly became popular in Britain and France. The name Toile de Jouy originated in France in the late 18th century and means “cloth from Jouy”, a town near Paris.

Christophe-Phillipe Oberkampf set up business in Jouy-en-Josas outside Paris in 1759, where he joined with engraver and designer Jean Baptiste Huet to design idyllic pastoral scenes for their fabrics.

The designs on toile de jouy vary greatly, but they all have detailed scenes scattered over the fabric. Originally the scenes were carved on woodblocks or engraved on copper then printed in only one colour (often red, black, or blue) on to a white or cream background.

toilemain

Les Traveaux de la Manufacture (The Activities of the Factory), 1783–84, designed by Jean-Baptiste Huet

 

toilesballoon

Toile fabrics are a fascinating record of the times both past and present, often depicted historical events, such as the pattern above c. 1784 based on two etching made shorly after the Montgolfier brothers successful ascent in hydrogen-filled hot air balloons

2ca39358f5d79e29edc51f495862530c

Detail from a more modern toile fabric  by Ashley Wilde.

 

3e35845507847d82a6d62a45bb2b61ea

Even more recently, Mike Diamond from the Beastie Boys designed Brooklyn Toile (above) as a wallpaper. Together with designer Vincent J. Ficarra he created a toile depicting his favorite Brooklyn scenes.

toile de jouy ALL

 Toile has come to be used for interiors, both wallpaper and soft furnishings in this vibrant room.

4d4c54283bc1c9abb1ee460dff296b19

Here Toile de Jouy is being used for clothing  in this 1950’s style Bernie Dexter dress.

Website

Ebay

 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

 

Artist Textiles.

1 Comment

 

The early 20th century saw the rise of artists having their designs  printed on fabric to be used in the house or as pieces of clothing. This meant that their art was accessible to the masses rather than being owned by galleries or the very rich. After the war a movement called ‘a masterpiece in every home’ became popular and saw many great artists such as Salvador Dali, Joan Miro and John Piper having their designs printed and used widely.

1415372_790148567670353_6477592063637041783_o

Rare vintage 1920’s cotton fabric by french textile artist Raoul Dufy who was one of the first to have his designs printed on cotton fabric. This piece was originally used as a pair of curtains.

10374520_789653104386566_365089433990941916_n

This wonderful Picasso print cotton fabric made into 1950’s style dress. By the 1960’s  Picasso was allowing many of his art work to be printed on to dress fabric, he apparently wouldn’t allow his work to be used for sofas or chairs “Picasso may be leaned against, not sat on” the curator of the 2014 exhibition of textile art  was quoted as saying.

IMGP0767a

The piece above printed on soft rayon material, originally curtains is now being made into a skirt.

JohnPiper3a

Northern Cathedral – a 1960’s work  by John Piper screen printed on  cotton fabric.

 

 

Website

Ebay

 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

What People make with the Fabric I Sell – Jo’s Bold Dahlia Print Blind

Leave a comment

Jo from Valhalla Interiors & Vintage bought this bold cotton interiors fabric from me recently to make a blind for her bathroom. Valhalla Interiors provide a traditional upholstery service making made to measure curtains, cushions and blinds  as well as up-cycling painted furniture in  unusual ways

$(KGrHqJ,!ogFHFg2YquBBR0ZktEP+g~~60_12

As well as their facebook page , they have a great pinterest page with a section showing completed work.

1236821_619622091393236_2098671331_n

This blind is one Jo wants to keep for herself and I don’t blame her, it makes a real statement and goes so well with the teal coloured tiles..

Further information about Vintage Fabric can be found at the links below.