The History of Paisley Fabric

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Paisley is a  design that is many hundreds of years old and can be traced back to ancient Persia, now Iran.

The fashion for using the pattern spread to many other Asian and Indian countries over the following centuries and it was in the Moghul period between the years 1526-1764 that it became the most popular, appearing on everything from stone carvings to the dress of Princes and Holy Men.

The ceramic tile below showing religious and political advisors of the Shah of Iran wearing  paisley printed robes.

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Paisley fabrics and shawls were imported to Britain form Asia for years, until the Napoleonic wars of the early 19th century put a stop to trading and exporting of goods, which meant that luxury items such as this could no longer be imported. This was also a time of great unemployment in Scotland, so former silk manufacturers in Paisley, used their skills to make shawls and the industry thrived, leading to the name for the design which is so familiar. The introduction of the jacquard loom also meant that a wider variety of Paisley patterns could be produced more quickly and efficiently.

 

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William Holman Hunt, “A Lady in an Interior,” c.1850

 

Changes in fashion led to the demise of the popularity of the shawl in the late 1800s, once the shawls were inexpensive enough that every woman could afford to own one, no one wanted to wear them.

In the 1960’s the paisley pattern became popular again.  There was a great fascination for Eastern cultures and their fabrics, the Beatles especially were very interested in Indian music and were influential in spreading the word widely. Music, art and fabric designed for clothing and interiors all showed this trend.It was fashionable, especially in the hippy movement to wear dresses and kaftans in paisley designs, the style reflected in the fashion of the time.

 

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 Mick Jagger in 1967 wearing a paisley print jacket.

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1960’s /70’s Mary Quant body stocking

 

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Needlecord fabric in paisley design from the 1960’s

The paisley pattern is still widely used today in dress making, not just by lovers of vintage and retro but as an alternative to more commonly used floral designs.

Paisley fabric for sale

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Indian Influence in 1960’s Fabric Design

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In the late 1960’s and early 70’s there was a great fascination for Eastern cultures. The Beatles especially were very interested in Indian music and were influential in spreading the word widely. Music, art and fabric designed for clothing and interiors all showed this trend.

It was a fashionable, especially with the hippy movement to wear kaftans, paisley designs and batik printed clothing from India.  The style was reflect in much of the fashion of the time.

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Zandra Rhodes 1969 circle dress now in the V&A museum, in an Indian influenced print.

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 Mick Jagger in 1967 wearing a paisley print jacket.

 

Indian fabrics were also widely used in interiors, for bed spreads and curtains.

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The curtains above in a fabric called ‘indian summer’ designed by Jyoti Bhomik for Heals in 1966. Jyoti Bhomik a young designer born in India worked exclusively for Heal’s during the 1960’s,  his fabric is still sought after today.

 

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British designers of the era such as Collier Campbell also showed their interest in eastern culture in fabric designs such as ‘Zebak’ and ‘kasbah’.

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Barkcloth, Birds and Cherry Trees

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A sunny April morning in our Gloucestershire orchard. The bird cherry is full of blossom and the birds are singing, you can pick out a chiff chaff amongst others in the video below.

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The fabric on the washing line is mid century barkcloth cotton, the two on the right are Heal’s ‘cherry orchard’ ( appropriately) by Irmgard Krebs and blue ‘counters’ by Richard Jarvis.

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Where has the time gone? It is mid June now and the cherries are on the trees, the grass has grown lots and I have sold most of the fabric on the washing line.

I really should post more often but life has been so busy.

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Vintage Fabric – Updating the Website..

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Time for the annual update of Vintage Fabric’s website..

The site has useful and interesting links for anyone keen on fabric, sewing and interiors.   As well as information about us and our blog, it has links to our ebay shop ‘vintage fabric and curtains’, a page showing all the Sanderson fabric we have in stock ( changed frequently), one dedicated to fabric bundles and a fabric of the month page.

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Fabric bundles useful for patchwork and crafts, the one below is made up of rare and unusual Laura Ashley cotton pieces.

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‘Fabric of the Month’ showcases a favourite or special fabric or textile; the idea is to change the page monthly, though time goes too quickly at times…

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A page showing the Sanderson & William Morris fabric we have in stock..

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Let’s hope that it can be found on Google and other search engines now..

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Grautex. Mid-Century Danish Textiles

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Grautex fabrics were a leading textile company  in the 1950’s through to the 1970’s. They were based in Copenhagen, Denmark and used many well known artists and designers of the time such as  Joan Nicola Wood,  Kirtsen Romer and Ronald Hansen who produced art prints such as pine trees ( below) and beech trees panels.

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Ronald Hansen –  pine trees

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Arne Emil Jacobsen, meadow. 1951

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‘Hyacinth Glasses’ Printed Cotton Panel Designed
by Arne Jacobsen for Grautex Fabrics  1950

 

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‘continental flower squares’ 1951

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Joan Nicola Wood ‘carnival’

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Kirsten Romer ‘skrapper’

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Toile de Jouy Fabric

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Toile prints were originally produced in Ireland in the mid-18th Century and quickly became popular in Britain and France. The name Toile de Jouy originated in France in the late 18th century and means “cloth from Jouy”, a town near Paris.

Christophe-Phillipe Oberkampf set up business in Jouy-en-Josas outside Paris in 1759, where he joined with engraver and designer Jean Baptiste Huet to design idyllic pastoral scenes for their fabrics.

The designs on toile de jouy vary greatly, but they all have detailed scenes scattered over the fabric. Originally the scenes were carved on woodblocks or engraved on copper then printed in only one colour (often red, black, or blue) on to a white or cream background.

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Les Traveaux de la Manufacture (The Activities of the Factory), 1783–84, designed by Jean-Baptiste Huet

 

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Toile fabrics are a fascinating record of the times both past and present, often depicted historical events, such as the pattern above c. 1784 based on two etching made shorly after the Montgolfier brothers successful ascent in hydrogen-filled hot air balloons

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Detail from a more modern toile fabric  by Ashley Wilde.

 

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Even more recently, Mike Diamond from the Beastie Boys designed Brooklyn Toile (above) as a wallpaper. Together with designer Vincent J. Ficarra he created a toile depicting his favorite Brooklyn scenes.

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 Toile has come to be used for interiors, both wallpaper and soft furnishings in this vibrant room.

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Here Toile de Jouy is being used for clothing  in this 1950’s style Bernie Dexter dress.

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